Election 2019: Comparing Party Platforms

How Canada’s major federal political parties compare on issues related to privacy and access to information

The table below uses publicly available information contained within the platforms of Canada’s four major political parties: the Liberal Party, the Conservative Party, the New Democratic Party, and the Green Party.

FIPA is a non-partisan organization and this chart is only intended to be an easily accessible guide on how the parties are addressing issues related to privacy and access to information. It is not an endorsement of any particular party.

For more information about the specific statements issued by each party leading to these determinations, please see the information below the chart.

 Liberal PartyConservative PartyNew Democratic PartyGreen Party
Totals6329
Increase the powers of the Privacy Commissioner of CanadaYesUnclearYesYes
Increase the powers of the Information Commissioner of CanadaNothing stated Nothing statedNothing statedYes
Improve Access to InformationNothing statedNothing statedNothing statedYes
Ensure Political Parties fall under Canada's federal privacy legislation Nothing stated Nothing statedNothing stated Yes
Mandatory breach notifications YesUnclearNothing statedYes
Give citizens the ability to erase basic personal information from platforms YesUnclearNothing statedYes
Give citizens data portability YesNothing statedNothing stated Yes
Create stronger cyberbullying protectionsYesYesYesNothing stated
Create mandatory plain language consent agreementsNothing statedYesNothing stated Nothing stated
Give citizens ability to review and challenge amount of personal information being collected by governmentYesNoNothing stated Yes
Create regulations related to Artificial IntelligenceNothing stated YesNothing statedYes

Each of these determinations are based on the platform documents released by the major four political parties in 2019:

Liberal Party of Canada Platform 2019

Conservative Party of Canada Platform 2019

New Democratic Party of Canada Platform 2019

Green Party of Canada Platform 2019

Below are the quotes and page numbers where each of these determinations can be corroborated.

We encourage all political parties to provide us with additional details about their commitments, or to provide us with clarification on their positions, by writing to us (fipa@fipa.bc.ca).

Increase the powers of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada

Liberal Party: Yes. Included in Canada’s Digital Charter (40-41).

Conservative Party: Unclear. “We will employ sensible regulation, rigorous standards, and strong oversight over the personal information, data, and privacy of Canadians” (74).

New Democratic Party: Yes. The “New Democrats will work to strengthen privacy protections for Canadians by boosting the power of the Privacy Commissioner to make and enforce orders” (102).

Green Party: Yes. “Significantly increase the powers of the Privacy Commissioner, in particular to protect identity and personal data, and to enforce privacy laws” (75).

Increase the powers of the Information Commissioner of Canada

Liberal Party: Nothing stated.

Conservative Party: Nothing stated.

New Democratic Party: Nothing stated.

Green Party: Yes. Will “[s]trengthen the role and protect the independence of parliamentary officers including … the Information Commissioner” (73). They will also “[a]uthorize the Information Commissioner to order the release of information” (74)

Improve Access to Information

Liberal Party: Nothing stated.

Conservative Party: Nothing stated.

New Democratic Party: Nothing stated.

Green Party: Yes. They will do this by: removing all fees except filing fee; creating enforceable deadlines; put parliament, the PMO’s office, and all minister’s offices, within scope of ATI; ensure public interest comes before secrecy; allow Information Commissioner to review and determine if cabinet confidence applies; create a duty to document regarding ATI decisions (74).

Ensure Political Parties fall under Canada’s federal privacy legislation

Liberal Party: Nothing stated.

Conservative Party: Nothing stated.

New Democratic Party: Nothing stated.

Green Party: Yes. “Require political parties to follow the Privacy Act, without exceptions” (75).

Mandatory breach notifications

Liberal Party: Yes. Included in Canada’s Digital Charter. Also includes compensation (40-41).

Conservative Party: Unclear. Will establish “binding cyber security standards for critical infrastructure sectors and penalties for non-compliance” to protect Canadians from “largescale data breaches” (75).

New Democratic Party: Nothing stated.

Green Party: Yes. Will “[c]reate mandatory data breach reporting for all government departments, companies, banks and political parties” (75).

Give citizens the ability to erase basic personal information from platforms

Liberal Party: Yes. Included in Canada’s Digital Charter (40-41).

Conservative Party: Unclear. “We will employ sensible regulation, rigorous standards, and strong oversight over the personal information, data, and privacy of Canadians” (74).

New Democratic Party: Nothing stated.

Green Party: Yes. “Require companies to … to delete personal information from company databases when requested by that person. Individuals would have the ‘right to be forgotten.’” (75).

Give citizens data portability

Liberal Party: Yes. Included in Canada’s Digital Charter (40-41).

Conservative Party: Nothing stated.

New Democratic Party: Nothing stated.

Green Party: Yes. “Require companies to grant access to all information they hold on an individual” (75).

Create stronger cyberbullying protections

Liberal Party: Yes. Included in Canada’s Digital Charter (40-41) Will also “move forward with new regulations for social media platforms, starting with a requirement that all platforms remove illegal content, including hate speech, within 24 hours or face significant financial penalties. This will also include other online harms, such as radicalization, incitement to violence, exploitation of children, or creation or distribution of terrorist propaganda. Because hate speech continues to harm people offline as well, we will also look at options for civil remedies for victims of hate speech” (47-48).

Conservative Party: Yes. Will introduce the Cyberbullying Accountability Act, legislation that “prohibits the use of a phone or the internet to threaten or advocate self-harm”, create civil liability so that “the parents, guardians, or account holders of cyberbullies can be held liable” (74).

New Democratic Party: Yes. Will convene a “national working group to counter online hate and protect public safety, and make sure that social media platforms are responsible for remove [sic] hateful and extremist content before it can do harm” (96).

Green Party: Nothing stated.

Create mandatory plain language consent agreements

Liberal Party: Nothing stated.

Conservative Party: Yes. Will also only allow “data that is necessary to provide the service” to be collected (74).

New Democratic Party: Nothing stated.

Green Party: Nothing stated.

Give citizens ability to review and challenge amount of personal information being collected by government

Liberal Party: Yes. Included in Canada’s Digital Charter (40-41).

Conservative Party: No. Will increase funding to police infrastructure: “To better support local law enforcement, a new Conservative government will commit $30 million over five years to purchase new equipment. This would benefit mid-sized communities the most, since they do not have the same budget as larger police programs to access technology. We will create a grant program so that our law enforcement has access to every tool and technology available. This will empower law enforcement to keep our communities and neighbourhoods safe” (64).

New Democratic Party: Nothing stated.

Green Party: Yes. “Change the law to require the Communications Security Establishment and CSIS to get a warrant before intruding on Canadians’ communications”; “Prohibit the routine surveillance of Canadians who protest against the government and the sharing of protesters and NGO staff information with the National Energy Board, and others”; and “Prohibit cyber surveillance and bulk collection of data by intelligence and police agencies” (75).

Create regulations related to Artificial Intelligence

Liberal Party: Nothing stated.

Conservative Party: Yes. Will establish “regulatory standards for ethical and secure use” of Artificial Intelligence (74).

New Democratic Party: Nothing stated.

Green Party: Yes. Will create parliamentary committee to examine issues that include Artificial Intelligence (46).

Best Practices in Whistleblower Legislation: An Analysis of Federal and Provincial Legislation Relevant to Disclosures of Wrongdoing in British Columbia

Best Practices in Whistleblower Legislation, prepared by Carroll Anne Boydell, instructor of criminology at Kwantlen Polytechnic University on behalf of the British Columbia Freedom of Information and Privacy Association, compares BC’s new whistleblower legislation, the Public Interest Disclosure Act (PIDA), to international best practices standards.

Best practice principles exist for laws, regulations, and procedures aimed at the protection of those who report wrongdoing. The purpose of this paper is to examine selected legislation containing whistleblower protections that are relevant to those who disclose wrongdoing in British Columbia to determine how well they follow best practice principles. Several best practice principles were reflected in the legislation reviewed, and the introduction of the new Public Interest Disclosure Act in British Columbia is a positive development in the protection of whistleblowers who are employees of the provincial government.

However, not all best practice principles are enshrined in the laws examined here. For example, there are still types of whistleblowers that do not have adequate protections, such as private sector workers and those in the public sector who are not employed by a provincial ministry, government body, or office. In addition, though types of protected disclosures have been expanded under the PIDA, there are still some disclosures of wrongdoing that may remain unprotected, such as interference with freedom of information requests. Some issues were also found related to transparency of decisions made about investigations into disclosures of wrongdoing and complaints of reprisal against whistleblowers, as well as about the accountability of government agencies in protecting whistleblowers. Therefore, some refinements and amendments to whistleblower laws and disclosure management procedures are needed to ensure that adequate protections are afforded to those who disclose wrongdoing in British Columbia.

Download the resource.

For more than twenty years, the B.C. Freedom of Information and Privacy Association has relied on the support of our community to provide resources, educational programming, and one-on-one advice. By making a contribution to the Association in exchange for this resource, you’re helping us provide another two decades of service to Canadians and supporting more publications like this in the future. There is no minimum donation amount. Every bit helps.

Click here to make a donation. We hope you consider supporting the Associations.

Let us know what you think: If you have comments, questions, or concerns about the report, please send them to FIPA at fipa@fipa.bc.ca or tweet to us @BCFIPA.

Access in the Academy: Bringing FOI and ATI to Academic Research

AccessAcademy_CoverAccess in the Academy, developed by the Freedom of Information and Privacy Association and Mike Larsen of Kwantlen Polytechnic University (Instructor, Dept. of Criminology), and generously funded by the Law Foundation of British Columbia, is a brand new educational resource that provides a unique and practical look at how researchers, students, and others in the higher education can make the most of FOI and ATI practices.

Although they shed valuable light on just how public records are produced, managed, and distributed (or withheld), FOI and ATI remain a rarity in the university classroom. This resource hopes to change that. By outlining the general contours of our federal and provincial access regimes and by providing strategies for how to incorporate both into your research designs, Access in the Academy makes a much-needed and highly accessible contribution to the Canadian legal research landscape.

Written by one of Canada’s leading FOI and ATI researchers, produced by Canada’s only non-profit organization solely dedicated to protecting and advancing the information rights of citizens, and extensively reviewed by a diverse team of information experts, librarians, advocates, educators, and students, Access in the Academy is a valuable addition to any research syllabus.

For more than twenty years, the B.C. Freedom of Information and Privacy Association has relied on the support of our community to provide resources, educational programming, and one-on-one advice. By making a contribution to the Association in exchange for this resource, you’re helping us provide another two decades of service to Canadians and supporting more publications like this in the future. There is no minimum donation amount. Every bit helps.

Click here to make a donation. We hope you consider supporting the Association, but more importantly, we hope you find Access in the Academy a valuable and practical addition to your research activities!

Download the resource.

About the Author: Mike Larsen is a Professor of Criminology at Kwantlen Polytechnic University. He is also Co-Managing Editor of the Journal of Prisoners on Prisons (jpp.org), a prisoner-authored and peer-reveiwed journal dedicated to experiential narratives and analysis related to spaces and practices of incarceration. His current research draws on a case study analysis of the Canadian security certificate regime to explore issues at the intersection of national security politics and contestations around access to information and secrecy. Mike has recently compiled an edited volume (with Kevil Walby) called Brokering Access: Politics, Power and Freedom of Information in Canada (UBC Press, 2012). Other forthcoming works discuss systemic access to information requests as a research technique for critical social science and questions of accountability and transparency related to collaborative security practices.

Let us know what you think: If you have comments, questions, or concerns about Access in the Academy, please send them to FIPA at fipa@vcn.bc.ca.