Data Subjects: Policing Info World conference

In this special edition episode of our Data Subjects podcast, we revisit our Policing Info World conference. On May 23, 2019, we co-hosted a conference that explored the data behind crime, law enforcement, and surveillance. Along with department of criminology at Kwantlen Polytechnic University and the BC Civil Liberties Association, we heard from experts in law enforcement, academia, and the legal profession.

As this was a full-day conference, this episode is very long. Please see the show notes below to find the time codes and descriptions for specific panels and panelists.

This conference wouldn’t have been possible without the support of our sponsors: CUPE BC, News Media Canada, and Web exPress.

Show Notes

00:02:15Opening Remarks
00:07:49Panel 1: Data and New 
Surveillance Modes and 
Capacities
00:08:17Moderator: Mike Larsen 
(Professor and Co-Chair, 
Department of Criminology, 
Kwantlen Polytechnic 
University, FIPA 
President)
00:10:00Michelle Davey 
(Superintendent, 
Investigative Support Services, 
Vancouver Department)
00:28:00Dr. Wade Deisman (Associate 
Dean, Faculty of Arts, Kwantlen 
Polytechnic University)
00:50:10Josh Paterson (Executive Director, BC Civil Liberties Association)
01:08:38Questions
01:46:00Panel 2: Data and Predictive 
Policing
01:46:30Moderator: Dr. Carroll Boydell 
(Instructor,Department of 
Criminology, Kwantlen 
Polytechnic University)
01:48:02Ryan Prox (S/Constable, Crime 
Analytics Advisory & 
Development Unit, Vancouver
Police Department)
01:48:27Mike Larsen (Professor, 
Department of Criminology, 
Kwantlen Polytechnic 
University)
02:13:00Panel 3: Data and Bias-Free 
Policing
02:13:16Moderator: Sara Neuert 
(Executive Director, BC Freedom 
of Information and Privacy 
Association)
02:14:43Dylan Mazur (Community Lawyer, 
BC Civil Liberties Association)
02:31:36Michelle A. Cameron (Advisor /
Investigator, the University of 
British Columbia)
02:40:01Questions
03:27:09Panel 4: Data and the Border
03:27:24Moderator: Mark Hosak (Director 
of Community Engagement, BC 
Civil Association)
03:29:19Peter Edelmann (Immigration 
Lawyer, Edelmann and Company 
Law Offices)
03:58:41Meghan McDermott (Staff 
Counsel, BC Civil Liberties 
Association)
04:27:26Questions

Introducing: Data Subjects, a new podcast from FIPA

Data Subjects is a new podcast dedicated to issues surrounding privacy and freedom of information rights in Canada.

The show marks FIPA’s first foray into the world of podcasts. Episodes will tackle a wide variety of topics, from the history of FOI in Canada, to the pitfalls of our modern privacy rights, and many more. Each episode will feature interviews with some of Canada’s most renowned figures from both the privacy and FOI landscapes, as well as stories from within FIPA.

Data Subjects will launch this spring and will be available on your favourite podcast provider like Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, and on our website.

The SINs of the Speculation and Vacancy Tax

Image of luxury tax square on monopoly board

We’ve been hearing from a lot of British Columbians who are concerned about sharing their Social Insurance Number (SIN) with the Ministry of Finance in the administration of the new Speculation and Vacancy Tax.

The Social Insurance Number is a sensitive piece of personal information that should only be provided under very specific circumstances. The concern from the public centers around the justification of the provincial government in asking for this information.

In order to provide more information to the public, we’ve reached out to the Ministry of Finance about where they draw the authority to request SINs, why they are necessary in the administration of the new tax, and how this information is going to be kept secure.

Before proceeding with the Ministry of Finances response, a general familiarization with two pieces of provincial legislation is useful: The first is with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act , which delineates how public bodies collect, use, and store personal information; and the second is the Speculation and Vacancy Tax Act, which outlines the administration of the new tax.

What follows is a response from the Ministry of Finance:

Authority to Collect SIN:

Social Insurance Numbers (SIN) are fundamental to British Columbia and Canada’s taxation system.  The Speculation and Vacancy Tax Act, subsection 64(1) authorizes the administrator to collect information from property owners through the annual declaration in order to administer the act.  Requiring personal information, including the SIN, is necessary for the administrator to determine tax liability, identifying whether property owners pay income taxes in Canada and whether an individual may be eligible for a tax exemption or BC tax credit. 

Why the SIN is being collected:

The collection of SIN is crucial to identify whether home owners pay tax in Canada and to confirm residency information.  This information is relevant to ensure individuals that live in their home, and are eligible, receive the principal residence exemption.  In addition, residency information is required to determine the amount of tax an individual is subject to, and, if applicable, the amount of speculation and vacancy tax credit an individual may receive.

How information is kept secure:

The SIN is one piece of personal information that is collected through the online declaration application.  eTaxBC is the online secure government application that is used for the declaration process.  All information entered into eTaxBC is encrypted at the time of entry.  Once a SIN is collected it is masked and the ability for employees to view the number is controlled by security access on a need to know basis. The personal information that is collected under the Speculation and Vacancy Tax Act is protected in a manner consistent with the BC Government’s Information Security Policy, Federal Security Standards, and provisions of the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act.

– The Ministry of Finance

A step towards accountability

Media Release

A small step towards open and transparent government

Vancouver, February 5, 2019 – The B.C. Freedom of Information and Privacy Association is pleased with the recommendations made by the province’s top watchdogs to bring the Legislative Assembly of B.C. under the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA).

Signed by Information and Privacy Commissioner Michael McEvoy, Merit Commissioner Fiona Spencer, and Ombudsperson Jay Chalke, the recommendations called for the Legislature to “meet the same standards” that 2,900 other provincial public bodies are subject to. 

While opening the Legislature to freedom of information rules is a welcome sight, the move is ultimately just one of the steps to a full reform that FIPA has been calling for in the past two decades. “This is just one little piece of the puzzle and there’s a whole lot of reform that we’re trying to get,” says Executive Director Sara Neuert. “We continue to be in reactionary mode and we need to move a step further and be proactive.”

These recommendations will only act to prevent the exact same scandal from repeating itself, more effective change would address a broader scale of freedom of information reform.

The Special Committee to Review the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA) drafted in May of 2016 has made calls for a comprehensive reform, which would include the enactment of a Duty to Document, penalties for interference, and addressing the exceptions and loopholes that can be routinely exploited during any FOI proceedings.

These comprehensive reforms are the only measures that will provide government transparency and establish a system of accountability that will prevent future government scandals from occurring.

Contact:

Sara Neuert, Executive Director

BC Freedom of Information and Privacy Association

Email: fipa (at) fipa.bc.ca

Phone: 604-739-9788

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