2020 Information Summit: Trust through Transparency

In prior years, Information Summit has been an opportunity for speakers and professionals to gather, network and explore issues and concepts around information, transparency, and privacy. COVID-19 means the all-day conference is not happening, but the opportunity to hear from and ask questions of great speakers on topics that matter remains.

Held over lunch, this series of online Microsoft Teams meetings is capped at 250 participants each. Registrants will be able to join, hear brief presentations, and our moderators will facilitate questions from attendees. We have some great speakers and panels in the queue, with more to be announced. Our first event with the Commissioner is free. Each subsequent meeting will have a flat registration fee of $30. Check back here for updates in the weeks ahead.

Event 1 – Transparency and Privacy during COVID

When: September 30, 2020

Commissioner Michael McEvoy from the Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner (OIPC) kicks things off. He will be focusing on transparency and privacy in the context of COVID-19 along with recent work at the OIPC. Given the impacts we’ve seen through this global pandemic be sure to sign up for this event quickly. 

This event has been accredited by the Law Society of BC for 1.0 Continuing Professional Development credit.


Event 2 – Troubling Clouds

When: October 1, 2020

FIPA’s latest report is titled: Troubling Clouds: Gaps affecting privacy protection in British Columbia’s K-12 education system. This meeting is a virtual face to face with report author Matthew A. J. Levine as he details his findings and recommendations that impact anyone in K-12. The report exposes that whether in the classroom or online BCs patchwork approach impacts the privacy of kids, educator and parents in the system. 

This event has been accredited by the Law Society of BC for 1.0 Continuing Professional Development credit.


Event 3 – Trust through Transparency

When: October 15, 2020

Trust is measurable and has a value. For private institutions and a variety of public bodies, trust has been eroding, but there are actions that can be taken to repair, build and maintain that trust. There are also actions people can take to discover whether organizations are worthy of their trust. This panel examines how trust is connected to concepts of transparency and privacy.

This event has been accredited by the Law Society of BC for 1.0 Continuing Professional Development credit.


We would like to thank our sponsor:

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2020 Information Summit presents “Trust through Transparency”

Trust is measurable and has a value. For private institutions and a variety of public bodies, trust has been eroding, but there are actions that can be taken to repair, build and maintain that trust. There are also actions people can take to discover whether organizations are worthy of their trust.    

This panel examines how trust is connected to concepts of transparency and privacy. Dr. David Dunne, Professor at the University of Victoria and Director of MBA Programs at the Gustavson School of Business, is part of The Gustavson Brand Trust Index measuring the public trust of over 300 brands in Canada annually. He will be speaking to recent findings and how trust and transparency intersect. Katherine Reilly, an Associate Professor at Simon Fraser University School of Communication, will be speaking about the concept of citizen data audits and how these empower people to hold the organizations controlling their data and information to account. FIPA is excited to have both presenters speaking on issues at the heart of trust through transparency.   

For anyone interested in the value of trust, as well as legal and privacy professionals, this presentation and facilitated question and answer session presents a unique opportunity to delve deeper into the practices, ethical considerations, and implications to governance as organizations and people strive to build, restore, or maintain trust.

This event has been accredited by the:

Law Society of BC for 1.0 Continuing Professional Development credit

International Association of Privacy Professionals for 1.0 Continuing Privacy Education credit.

Date & Time:
October 15, 2020
12:00 PM – 1:00 PM (check-in at 11:30 AM)
Platform:
The event will be held via Microsoft Teams. More information will be sent upon registration.
Tickets:
$30

Featuring Dr. David Dunne & Dr. Katherine Reilly

Dr. David Dunne joined the Gustavson School of Business in 2014. His research explores how designers apply in-depth user research and creative thinking methods to “wicked problems”; critical, chronic problems in society and business with no clear start or end point, problems in the health care system for example. His research has been published in business and design journals, including Harvard Business Review and Academy of Management Learning & Education. He has held appointments at design schools in the Netherlands, the US and Mexico. Dunne teaches design, strategy and marketing to students and executives worldwide. His recent executive teaching/consulting clients include AstraZeneca, Corus Entertainment, GlaxoSmithKline, Mt Sinai Hospital and Ontario Local Health Integration Networks.

Dr. Katherine Reilly is Associate Professor in the School of Communication at Simon Fraser University. Broadly speaking, her work focuses on the role of communications in international relations and international development including the impact of information and communications technologies on political and social processes in Latin America, the role of open data in development processes, and the political economy of media reform in Latin America. At present she is leading a project about Citizen Data Audits in collaboration with digital rights organizations and researchers in 6 countries in Latin America.  The project will establish citizen-centred criteria for evaluating private use of personal data, beyond standard government and business criteria like privacy, security, profitability and risk-management.  She also researches the idea of Platform Developmentalism which is the application of government policy to strategic management of platform capitalism for the achievement of social goals.


We would like to thank our sponsor:

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NEWS RELEASE: 2020 Information Summit launches September 30

VANCOUVER, September 17, 2020 – The Freedom of Information and Privacy Association (FIPA) is pleased to announce the details for our Information Summit 2020 and our first events slated to be held during Right to Know week. 

In prior years, Information Summit has been an opportunity for speakers and professionals to gather, network and explore issues and concepts around information, transparency and privacy. COVID-19 means the all-day conference is not happening, but the opportunity to hear from and ask questions of great speakers on topics that matter remains.  

“Trust through Transparency” is the theme of Info Summit 2020. It will be a series of online Microsoft Teams meetings capped at 250 participants each, held over lunch. Registrants will be able to join, hear brief presentations, and our moderators will facilitate questions from attendees. We have some great speakers and panels in the queue, with more to be announced in the weeks ahead. 

Starting today you’ll be able to register to participate in: 

Transparency and privacy during COVID – September 30th  

BC Information and Privacy Commissioner Michael McEvoy kicks things off. He will be focusing on transparency and privacy in the context of COVID-19 along with recent work at the OIPC. Given the impacts we’ve seen through this global pandemic be sure to sign up for this event quickly.  

Register and view events details here. 

Troubling Clouds – October 1st  

FIPA’s latest report is titled: Troubling Clouds: Gaps affecting privacy protection in British Columbia’s K-12 education system. This meeting is a virtual face to face with report author Matthew A. J. Levine as he details his findings and recommendations that impact anyone in K-12. The report exposes that whether in the classroom or online BCs patchwork approach impacts the privacy of kids, educator and parents in the system. 

Register and view events details here. 

Learn more about the released report here. 


You will need to register through Eventbrite to guarantee your space. Our first event with the Commissioner is free. Each subsequent meeting will have a flat registration fee of $30.  

Information Summit only happens through generous contributions of time and money from people and organizations. FIPA would like to thank all those whose support helps us deliver quality programming focused on your data and your rights.  

Contact: 
Jason Woywada, Executive Director 
BC Freedom of Information and Privacy Association 
(E): jason@fipa.bc.ca 
(T): 604-739-9788 


We would like to thank our sponsor:

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NEWS RELEASE: New report highlights gaps in student privacy in BC’s K-12 education system.

VANCOUVER, September 17, 2020 – The BC Freedom of Information and Privacy Association (FIPA) has released their latest report Troubling clouds: Gaps affecting privacy protection in British Columbia’s K-12 education system.  

Click here for full report.

 “The government is setting the system up for failure.” according to Jason Woywada BC FIPA Executive Director. “Without the resources, guidance and supports they need, teachers, schools, and districts are making the best of a bad situation. The result puts personal information in the system at risk.” 

The project started in 2018 when FIPA began hearing from educators, parents and students with questions and concerns about privacy.  Shifts towards cloud-based learning management systems (LMS) were leading to increasing concern and a search for answers. FIPA decided to launch a major research project to explore privacy protection in K-12 education across BC with more rigorous legal research and analysis. 

The project has come to fruition during the COVID-19 pandemic. The public health emergency is leading to even more digitization of workplaces and the education system. The closure of schools was combined with the temporary loosening of privacy safeguards to facilitate the use of online platforms and applications.  

With schools reopening, there are concerns about how students will be physically protected. This report reveals that, whether online or in the classroom, student privacy is being sacrificed by a patchwork approach. It highlights the need to develop systematic solutions for managing the risks going forward. 

“Education shouldn’t come at the expense of teacher and student privacy,”  Woywada  adds. “The recommendations are easily acted upon. Taking these steps will help ensure education doesn’t jeopardize the personal information of the students, parents and educators in the system.” 

We would like to thank lawyer, lead researcher, and project author Matthew A. J. Levine for his hard work on this comprehensive report, and the Law Foundation of British Columbia for their continued support and commitment. Mr. Levine will be presenting on this topic during a FIPA Information Summit 2020 event

Contact: 
Jason Woywada, Executive Director 
BC Freedom of Information and Privacy Association 
Email: jason@fipa.bc.ca 
Phone: 604-739-9788 


Recommendations 

  1. The Ministry of Education should play a more active role in supporting the procurement of cloud computing services. The Ministry’s strategic role in the public education system and relatively sophisticated information technology capacity should be leveraged to maximize resources, exchange knowledge, and develop best practices for privacy risk management. 
  1. Privacy Commissioner should make use of the International Conference of Data Protection and Privacy Commissioners’ (“ICDPPC”) activities regarding online platforms in public schools. Specifically, 
    1. Actively participate in the ICDPPC Digital Education Working Group’s activities, including the questionnaire that was circulated by the French data protection authority and Canada’s OPC in June 2019, so as to exchange best practices with other jurisdictions; 
    2. In light of commitments and norms embodied in ICDPPC Resolution, formulate a guidance document for public bodies in the education sector so that they may fully comply with their privacy obligations when engaged in contracting out cloud computing services. 
  1. School boards should ensure they have information technology and privacy expertise necessary to: 
    1. Conduct substantive privacy impact assessments on private sector providers of information technology services; 
    2. Develop policies and procedures to assess, approve, and support the use of internet platforms and software applications without compromising students’ privacy rights or shifting the privacy risk management burden; 
    3. Provide training and support for teachers in respect of classroom technology and privacy; 
    4. As required and appropriate, seek valid, informed and meaningful consent from individuals, i.e. students and guardians. 
  1. Ministry of Education and school boards should strengthen co-ordination to: 
    1. Negotiate, as necessary, service agreements with service providers who may be unwilling to negotiate with individual school districts; 
    2. Establish a shared mechanism for rating and otherwise exchanging knowledge about internet platforms and software applications; 
    3. Maintain said mechanism while taking on-board feedback from students, guardians, and teachers. 

2020 Information Summit: Trust through Transparency presents “Troubling Clouds”

FIPA’s latest report is titled: Troubling Clouds: Gaps affecting privacy protection in British Columbia’s K-12 education system. This meeting is a virtual face to face with report author Matthew A. J. Levine as he details his findings and recommendations that impact anyone in K-12. The report exposes that whether in the classroom or online BC’s patchwork approach impacts the privacy of kids, educator and parents in the system. 

Date & Time:
October 1, 2020
12:00 PM – 1:00 PM (check-in at 11:30 AM)
Platform:
The event will be held via Microsoft Teams. More information will be sent upon registration.
Tickets:
$30

This project was initiated in 2018 through the Law Foundation and included extensive legal research from author Matthew A.J. Levine. Mr. Levine will make a brief presentation on the following topic followed by a facilitated questions and answers. This Microsoft Teams meetings is capped at 250 participants. 

This session will focus on the growing shift towards cloud-based learning management systems (LMS) in B.C.’s K-12 education system.  Mr. Levine will present an overview of his legal research and recommendations. This shift means students, parents, educators and administrators are being forced to face extensive legal implications and impacts to their privacy. For legal and privacy professionals, educators, as well as anyone who has school-aged children, this presentation and facilitated question and answer session is a great opportunity to delve deeper into the findings and implications of this report. 

This event has been accredited by the Law Society of BC for 1.0 Continuing Professional Development credit.

Featuring Matthew A.J. Levine

Matthew A J Levine is a Canadian lawyer. He advises clients in the areas of corporate / commercial agreements, privacy and data protection, and supply chain risk management. His privacy practice includes advising on privacy compliance issues, anti-spam ‎law ‎compliance, and ‎information security breaches as well as privacy impact assessments.

A graduate of the University of British Columbia Faculty of Law, Matthew began his legal career in the Vancouver office of Borden Ladner Gervais LLP. An active writer, Matthew has previously contributed chapters to academic books published by Oxford UP and Cambridge UP, an online textbook published by Springer, and an expert report commissioned by a large, international civil society organization.


We would like to thank our sponsor:

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